Monthly Archives: October 2011

Emma, vol. 1

Emma, manga by Kaoru Mori. Volume 1 of 10. Emma is a young woman who works as a maid for a retired governess. William is the oldest son of a well-to-do merchant and was once the governess’ charge. This all takes place in 19th century London, so Emma and William’s love has class obstacles to … Continue reading »

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What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets

What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets, by Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio. At first glance, this book has a simple premise: to illustrate what people eat on a typical day. But it gets more complicated than that. You know those kids books about “how children live around the world?” It’s like that, … Continue reading »

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TTBOOK: Rerun culture. (Oct. 2)

Catching up on podcasts. This morning, I was listening to to the October 2nd To the Best of Our Knowledge (TTBOOK). After the interview with Simon Pegg on growing up as a nerd, I was thinking this would be a good podcast to blog about, seeing as I just read Ready Player One. And what’s … Continue reading »

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Ready Player One

Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline. Another fun, fast, read. The year is 2044 and the world is a big mess. But there’s this thing called OASIS, an immersive reality internet that many people find refuge in. They also find work, school, love, adventure… pretty much anything, there. OASIS’ inventor and owner, James Halliday, just … Continue reading »

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Book list: Time travel (3)

We have a science fiction and fantasy display at MPOW. Every month or two, the theme changes and I put together a list of books I can pick from to stock the display. The lists aren’t meant to be comprehensive or “best of.” They’re simply lists of books that fit the theme and are in … Continue reading »

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Book list: Time travel (2)

We have a science fiction and fantasy display at MPOW. Every month or two, the theme changes and I put together a list of books I can pick from to stock the display. The lists aren’t meant to be comprehensive or “best of.” They’re simply lists of books that fit the theme and are in … Continue reading »

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Book list: Time travel (1)

We have a science fiction and fantasy display at MPOW. Every month or two, the theme changes and I put together a list of books I can pick from to stock the display. The lists aren’t meant to be comprehensive or “best of.” They’re simply lists of books that fit the theme and are in … Continue reading »

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Reading list: U.S. Army professional reading list

The U.S. Army Center of Military History has a Recommended Professional Reading List, divided into four for audiences determined by rank and military experience, “from private to lieutenant to general.” These forty-four books would make a good reading list for anyone, military or civilian, who is interested in the history of warfare, with particular emphasis … Continue reading »

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Coolies / Brothers

Coolies, by Yin & Chris Soentpiet. Brothers, by Yin & Chris Soentpiet. I pickup up Brothers because of the cover. I checked it out because of the inside illos. I looked for the prequel because of the story. In the first book, Coolies, Chinese brothers Shek and Wong leave their family in 1865 and go … Continue reading »

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The RDA Primer: a Guide for the Occasional Cataloger

The RDA Primer: a Guide for the Occasional Cataloger, by Amy Hart. In only 80 pages, Amy Hart makes RDA make sense. Yes, really. She covers the elements of FRBR and FRAD, how they relate to RDA, then summarizes each section with thorough yet understandable charts. Even though RDA isn’t quite ready for prime time, … Continue reading »

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